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Persistent Part-Solid Nodule in the Lung Represents Pulmonary Adenocarcinoma

  • Sang Hwan Lee
    Correspondence
    Address for correspondence: Chang Min Park, MD, PhD, Seoul National University Hospital, 101 Daehangno, chongnogu, Seoul 110-744, South Korea
    Affiliations
    Department of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, and Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Seoul, South Korea
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  • Chang Min Park
    Affiliations
    Department of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, and Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Seoul, South Korea
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  • Jin Mo Goo
    Affiliations
    Department of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, and Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Seoul, South Korea
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  • Hyun Ju Lee
    Affiliations
    Department of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, and Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Seoul, South Korea
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      A 58-year-old female nonsmoker was referred for evaluation of an incidentally detected nodule in the right upper lung that had been detected on computed tomography (CT) scan performed for lung cancer screening. She had no pulmonary symptoms and was well. Nonenhanced CT scan of the chest revealed a 20-mm nodule having peripheral ground-glass opacity portion and central solid portion, known as “part-solid nodule” in the right upper lobe (Figure 1A, arrow). This nodule remained unchanged on follow-up CT scan taken 1 month later. She underwent lobectomy of the right upper lobe because persistent part-solid nodule is highly suggestive of pulmonary adenocarcinoma with bronchioloalveolar carcinoma pattern. Pathologic examination of tissue obtained from lobectomy (hematoxylin-eosin stain, 5×) confirmed the diagnosis of pulmonary adenocarcinoma with bronchioloalveolar carcinoma pattern (Figure 1B). She remained well, with no evidence of recurrence, 3 years after surgery. Pulmonary adenocarcinoma with bronchioloalveolar carcinoma pattern should be considered when persistent part-solid nodule is identified.
      • Nakata M
      • Saeki H
      • Takata I
      • et al.
      Focal ground-glass opacity detected by low-dose helical CT.
      Figure thumbnail gr1
      FIGURE 1Persistent part-solid nodule representing pulmonary adenocarcinoma in a 58-year-old woman. A, nonenhanced computed tomography (CT) scan of the chest shows a 20-mm nodule having peripheral ground-glass opacity portion and central solid portion, known as “part-solid nodule” in the right upper lobe. This lesion remained unchanged on follow-up CT taken 1month later. B, photomicrograph from lobectomy specimen reveals that this lesion is pulmonary adenocarcinoma with bronchioloalveolar carcinoma pattern (Hematoxylin-eosin stain, ×5).

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        • et al.
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